A mast year of international and local acorn lovers, oak specialists, new Board members, and mentor Marcie Mayer gathered at D Acres  on Sunday December 8th to share, celebrate, eat –  and compete with mighty (& mini) acorns again!

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Thanks to D Acres for hosting  in that beautiful bright & warm space, bravo to all who brought  oak art, acorn foods & beverages,  music,  and more.  Exciting  projects  in the works for 2020, with incoming board members: Marcie Mayer, Myles Green,  Heather Russo and Carol Ayoob. Details soon!

Meantime, old friends and new folks processed acorns together, broke acorn bread, spooned acorn mushroom stew, and raised barrel-aged beverages…

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Farmer Rich made fresh oak leaf tea.

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Oak / horticultural scholar (& outstanding chef) Jeffrey Thompson served stew and spoke on ecology and health of New England’s oak population.

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Younger sports hunted for golden acorns, colored fantastically and weighed in with some whoppers (though were soundly trounced by a Greek titan acorn)..

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An enormous Kean Oak acorn clearly dwarfed the New England Red Oak acorn submissions – almost double the size.  BRAVO!  No shame in losing this contest to “Acorn Lady” mentor Marcie and her harvest from the island forest she’s helped to steward and protect.

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Raffles prizes of Oak tree puzzle and Mossy Oak bluetooth speakers went home with good lookers and listeners.

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Participation on Sunday was beyond beautiful! Please  dryads, grow and share your enthusiasm for  the science,  social, nutritional, medicinal, and natural fun of this fruit of the oak. See you in the new year!

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Incidentally, one of the many names for December’s full moon is  “The Oak Moon“…

December full Moon

The Maine Farmer’s Almanac first published Indian names for the full Moons in the 1930’s. According to this almanac, the Algonquin tribes of what is now the northern and eastern United States named the full Moon in December or the last full Moon of the fall season the Cold Moon, due to the long, cold nights. An old European name for this Moon is the Oak Moon, a name that some believe ties back to ancient druid traditions of harvesting mistletoe from oak trees first recorded by the Roman historian Pliny the Elder in the 1st century CE. The term “druid” may derive from the Proto-Indo-European roots for “oak” and “to see,” suggesting druid means “oak knower” or “oak-seer.” Europeans also called this the Moon before Yule. Yule is an interesting celebration to learn more about…

As the full Moon closest to the winter solstice, Europeans named this the Long Night Moon. The plane of the Moon’s orbit around the Earth nearly matches the plane of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. When the path of the Sun appears lowest in the sky for the year, the path of the full Moon opposite the Sun appears highest in the sky. For the Washington, DC, area, on Wednesday evening, December 11, 2019, moonrise will be at 4:35 PM, sunset will be 11 minutes later at 4:46 PM, the Moon will reach its highest point of the night (72.2 degrees above the horizon) just after midnight at 12:02 AM on Thursday morning, sunrise will be at 7:17 AM, and moonset will be 16 minutes later at 7:33 AM EST. The Moon will be in the sky for a total of 14 hours 58 minutes, with 14 hours 13 minutes of this when the Sun is down, making Wednesday night into Thursday morning, December 11 to 12, 2019, the longest full Moon night of the year.

from: https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/news/1128/december-2019-the-next-full-moon-is-the-cold-moon/

A good time to quietly contemplate the year past, dream a bit and envision where you wish to find yourself in times to come. Blessings…